Core Courses for Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in INTERIOR STUDIES [Adaptive Reuse]
 

STUDIO: INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR STUDIES I
The first in a mandatory studio sequence, this course introduces the design principles in the fundamental framework for the reuse of existing structures. The semester is arranged around several projects, providing access to the discipline from as many related perspectives. The design problems require the student to visually and verbally convey clear design intent, think visually in two and three dimensions, formulate and develop abstract design concepts, discern relationships between design interventions and their physical and contextual setting and develop presentation skills to effectively communicate propositions and positions.

STUDIO: INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR STUDIES II
This course further develops design principles from the first semester and introduces students to methodological thinking in the relationship between context, scale and use. Real site situations are introduced and students develop individual design processes associating topological relationships between the interior and exterior, at multiple scales of interventions. Students will have the opportunity to explore design issues through both traditional and computer generated design.

STUDIO: INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR STUDIES III
This course builds on the skills and knowledge developed during the first year through the application of such knowledge on a larger scaled project of reuse. The student is required to address in full the hypothetical remodeling of an existing building of some complexity for a proposed new use.

DRAWING FOR INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE
This course introduces the student to means of representation of ideas for Interior Architecture through various types of drawings: orthographics, axonometrics, perspectives, freehand sketching and mixed media. Work will be produced on site from existing structures as well as in the studio when concentrating on concept development through drawing.

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING
The objective of this class is to learn basic digital techniques in spatial design. Students successfully completing this course should be able to develop sophisticated digital layouts with image processing software, create CAD based 2D architectural drawings and 3D models, and develop a 3D visualization of a design. In this course, we will also discuss the integration of 2D and 3D data, digital materials, as well as the basics of digital lighting and camera work.

BUILDING MATERIALS EXPLORATION
This class introduces the student to different building materials, their properties and characteristics. Through a series of full scale construction projects and material making processes, the student will be asked to explore these materials and their potential in the design of interior structures.

BUILDING STRUCTURES, SYSTEMS, AND ADAPTIVE REUSE
While introducing students to the principal concepts of structural design and mechanical systems, this course will attempt to provide a direct link to the built environment, with a focus on the rehabilitation, preservation and adaptive reuse of existing structures, both historical and contemporary. The presentation of case studies, the focus on the structural and mechanical aspects of students' individual studio projects and the excursion to at least one construction site will bridge the gap between class room and the world of building.

HISTORY OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE I: 1400-1850
This course will examine the major architectural personalities working in Europe (Italy, France, England, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands and in North America (the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico) in the period 1400 to 2009. Areas of study will include an examination of interior design related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to interior additions and renovations and other interventions. 

HISTORY OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE II: 1850 to Present
This course will examine the major designers working in the period 1850 to the present. Areas of study will include an examination of design related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to the history of interior interventions, additions and renovations.

HUMAN FACTORS
The psychology of the client/user influences the design of the environment and the practice of interior architecture. This course will explore issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design). During the semester, the student will gather facts about the interaction of the environment and a user's culture, gender, stage of life cycle, and physical characteristics. These ideas will be implemented in the design and construction of an object.

SPATIAL PERCEPTION: LIGHT & COLOR
This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of color and light as they apply to spatial and visual perceptions in the built environment. It is an opportunity to study color theory in conjunction with light, lighting systems and the effect of light on color.

SCHEME DETAILING
This course explores the principles of construction and design detailing. The student will detail the construction of a previously designed studio project. Finish materials, window treatments, light fixtures, and furniture will be selected. Construction methods and materials will be examined as well as the performance and appearance retention of finishes. Individual presentations will be made on a variety of traditional and nontraditional materials.

FINAL STUDIO PROJECT SEMINAR
Building on the final advanced studio in the undergraduate program, this course engages the graduating senior with research and design studies that expand the focus of the final studio. This will include reading, group discussions, testing of typology studies, further conceptual development and a writing component. The course will culminate in  a group project: the design and installation of the Senior Show as a demonstration of a design intervention within an existing structure. 


Core Classes for Master of Arts (MA) in Adaptive Reuse

SUMMER STUDIO IN SCANDINAVIA
The studio focuses on the process of adaptive reuse within the context of Copenhagen, a city committed to the issues of the environment and climate change. Students will be asked to address a design problem that deals with the relationship between conceptual design and its application within an existing structure. 

SCANDINAVIAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
This seminar combines an overview of Nordic architecture and design through lectures, a Visual Journal and workshops that engage with local Adaptive Reuse structures of Copenhagen. The students will explore the historical and current conditions of architecture, interior design, and planning from architectural, social, and political points of view.

ADAPTIVE REUSE DESIGN STUDIO
As the final studio in the year-long study of the practice of adaptive reuse, the student will have the opportunity to demonstrate these principles and theories in a complex design project of reuse.
With a local city as the setting for the project, students will experience firsthand the constraints of an existing structure. Students will also have the opportunity to use city resources such as a city's Department of Planning and Development, Historic District Commission, RI State Council on the Arts, etc. This project will serve as a model for engaging other real-world adaptive reuse applications.

GRAD ADAPTIVE REUSE SEMINAR
This seminar is taught in conjunction with the Adaptive Reuse Studio in which the students explore design innovation and its relationship to the constraints of an existing site. The student will select a topic of research in conjunction with their design project, formulate propositions and develop them with a team of advisers.

APPLIED BUILDING SYSTEMS: ADAPTIVE REUSE
This course approaches the subject of adaptive reuse through environmental issues, economic analysis and design. Course objectives include an understanding of energy and environmental context, the ability to develop schematic designs for energy efficient interventions in an existing building, the ability to perform basic analyses of the energy and economic performance of building measures and to apply course material to case studies of completed buildings. Students should develop familiarity with energy and environmental impacts associated with the built environment and the rationale for responsible design, energy modeling and calculations, passive and active lighting systems (including daylighting techniques and fenestration) and the thermal performance of buildings including the thermal envelope and passive and active heating systems.

PRINCIPLES OF ADAPTIVE REUSE
This course approaches the subject of adaptive reuse through the understanding of the rules and methods of design interventions. Analysis and synthesis regarding construction methods, structure, use, scale and the regulations pertaining to existing structures will be explored. Building on the framework of the International Building Code for Existing Structures, this course also examines the feasibility of reuse as defined by construction regulations and practice. Through this course, students develop an understanding for the design process necessary in implementation of adaptive reuse in the design profession.

THEORY OF ADAPTIVE REUSE
This lecture course will examine adaptive reuse through focusing on the historic, socio-economic and cultural contexts contributing to its implementation. The class will also study the differences in practice from countries in Northern Europe with its longstanding regard for reuse to countries with emerging practices.The lectures will address these differences through studies of buildings, unbuilt projects, and urban assemblages, which will be contextualized through common themes critical to understanding reuse.

ELECTIVES

SET DESIGN
The class seeks to examine set design within a studio environment that is as close as possible to that of the profession, allowing students the opportunity to work on numerous productions in the design roles within theatre and opera. Relevance will be attached to the exploration of visual solutions that are viscerally grounded in the text. Script analysis will be thorough and ongoing. Students will be expected to read and research one to two plays per week. All sets will be modeled, with fluctuating levels of completion.

ADVANCED COMPUTING: FUNDAMENTALS OF REVIT
Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as a digital representation of physical and functional characteristics of a facility. Revit is one of the most comprehensive and widely used BIM programs in the world. The software closes the gap between 3D geometry and building component data. This course will introduce students to Revit utilizing a hands-on approach. The class will introduce the essential concepts of the software through weekly class lectures/ tutorials. Weekly assignments will allow students to use their knowledge to complete real-life design tasks. Hands-on exercises will also focus on software interface, creation of parametric families and creation of construction document sets.

ADVANCED COMPUTING: DIGITAL FABRICATION
These 4 week workshops will engage desktop making tools to foster familiarity with digital fabrication in the design of the Interior environment. The student will explore the generation of new tectonic forms through abstract geometrical principles. Components of interior architecture will be modeled and fabricated with rapid prototyping and CNC machines. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
Equipment and software include: Laser Cutter, CNC Routing and 3D printing / Rhino 5.0 V. Windows + Grasshopper plug-in, VCarve

PORTFOLIO PREP & PRODUCTION
This class is primarily intended as a means for students in their year of graduation from the Department to prepare their portfolios for interviews with potential employers and for entry to the professional world of design. Using computer programs which will build upon knowledge already gained, the course will be helpful to all those who wish to gain some knowledge of techniques which will enhance the presentation of design work already completed. 

PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP
The professional experience and knowledge gained while in school are invaluable in determining career choices and directions. This opportunity provides internship experience as a credit bearing option. A proposal of professional firm and learning objectives must be submitted for approval. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND COLLABORATIVE STUDY
The Independent Study Project (ISP) allows students to supplement the established curriculum by completing a faculty supervised project for credit in a specific area of interest. Its purpose is to meet individual student needs by providing an alternative to regularly offered courses. A Collaborative Study Project (CSP) allows two students to work collaboratively to complete a faculty supervised project of indepedndent study.

ADVANCED DESIGN STUDIOS
Choice of advanced design studios offered by the Department of Interior Architecture. Details & studio descriptions are made available to pre-registered students. 


Core Courses for Master of Design (MDES) in Interior Studies [Adaptive Reuse]

 

STUDIO: INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN IA: SPATIAL INVESTIGATION:DRAWING & MAKING
This class will introduce the fundamentals of orthographic drawing through the investigation of an existing object. Working with the object, the student will study and implement the use of plan, section, axonometric and perspective to expose the spatial qualities of the structure. Basic drawing conventions and model making techniques will be introduced. The concept of architectural scale will be explored. 

STUDIO: INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN IB: EXISTING CONSTRUCT
Using an existing site, this studio will focus on the fundamentals of documenting an existing structure: measuring, surveying, photographing, analyzing of materials and construction details, researching databases for relevant, related information and understanding the existing structural and mechanical systems. This information will be organized to create a full architectural documentation set. The students will also learn to analyze the existing structure both as an entity and within the adjacent urban context. The studio will also focus on the presentation of such analysis and the possible uses of it in design transformation.

STUDIO: INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN IC: TRANSFORMATION & INTERVENTION
This studio will introduce the concept of transformation and intervention through a program of new use. The students will propose a design intervention based on the accommodation of the design program but will also be a response to the analysis completed in Studio Existing Construct. Requiring an understanding of the structural system and the issues of egress, the culmination of this studio will result in a design that is conceptually sound and complete in its description as a full architectural proposal in drawings and models. 

STUDIO: INTRO TO DESIGN II
This course builds on the foundations gained in previous studio and course work by specifically furthering design development abilities. The studio will require the integration of the student's emerging knowledge of site analysis, mapping & documentation, innovative tectonics and systems, applicable theoretical issues, relevant cultural precedents, and precise material investigation into a cohesive design agenda. 

ADVANCED DRAWING & COMPUTING TECTONICS
This course focuses on the drawing as it serves to convey different design intentions. This course will explore advanced techniques of digital representation: the construction of 3D drawings, the development of sophisticated digital layouts with image processing software, the creation of CAD based 2D architectural drawings and 3D models, and the development of a 3D visualization. The integration of 2D and 3D data, digital materials, as well as the basics of digital lighting and camera work will also be discussed.

STRUCTURES & MATERIALS
This lecture course is designed to familiarize students with structural principles and systems as they relate to the study of interior architecture. The course will examine the performance and composition of various structural systems, including wood, lightweight metal, steel, masonry, and concrete structures. To gain an understanding of structures, their materials and components in adaptive reuse, we will visit local examples in the built environment.

ENERGY AND SYSTEMS
This course provides students with an opportunity to study how distinct building systems are constructed to form a comprehensive whole. Through case studies, students will examine approaches to integrating a variety of systems, such as structural, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, acoustic, and communication systems. This course will focus on how interior architecture interfaces with existing buildings; the case studies will be of recent works that have altered existing building. 

SPATIAL PERCEPTION: LIGHT & COLOR
This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of color and light as it applies to spatial and visual perceptions in the built environment. It is an opportunity to study color theory in conjunction with light, lighting systems and the effect of light on color.

THEORY OF ADAPTIVE REUSE
This lecture course will examine adaptive reuse through focusing on the historic, socio-economic and cultural contexts contributing to its implementation. The class will also study the differences in practice from countries in Northern Europe with its longstanding regard for reuse to countries with emerging practices.The lectures will address these differences through studies of buildings, unbuilt projects, and urban assemblages, which will be contextualized through common themes critical to understanding reuse.

HISTORY OF ADAPTIVE REUSE
This course will examine the major architectural personalities working in Europe (Italy, France, England, Spain, Germany, the Netherlands) and in North America in the period 1800 to 2010. Areas of study will include an examination of adaptive reuse related issues that will be studied in the context of their social, political, technological, and economic circumstances, as they pertain to the design culture of the period. Special emphasis will be given to interior renovations, additions, transformations and other interventions of adaptive reuse.

HUMAN FACTORS: ERGONOMICS AND ACOUSTICS
This course will focus on factors influencing the design of the interior environment through exploring issues of anthropometrics (the study of the characteristics of the human body), ergonomics (the application of anthropometric data to design), and proxemics (the study of the effect of cultural/psychological factors on design). It will be complemented by a study of acoustics as it relates to the relationship between the built environment and sound; predicting and designing for the acoustic performance of spaces, and executing acoustic measurements.

CODES AND DETAILS
This class introduces the student to an overview of codes and its implementation through construction details, as related to the study of adaptive reuse. It will provide in depth focus on pertinent parts of local and national building codes that address issues affecting interior architecture such as egress, materials, planning, and accessibility. 

DESIGN THESIS PREPARATION
The first of the three-part Design Thesis sequence, this course is designed to assist students in identifying a thesis topic and respective thesis project. Group discussion and individual interviews focus on precedents, site related issues, program, and regulations, all of which are specific to adaptive reuse. The class culminates in the preparation of a feasibility report for a proposed Design Thesis to be implemented the following Spring semester. 

INVESTIGATING INTERIORITY
This course is a reinforcement of and  preparation for the self-choice Design Thesis that takes place the following Spring. The seminar will assist the student in becoming more aware of factors which determine a successful outcome for a design intervention within an existing building. As the second part of the three-part thesis sequence, the course builds upon the student’s Design Thesis Feasibility Report.  

DESIGN THESIS
Under the supervision of their thesis advisor, students are responsible for the preparation and completion of a fully articulated design proposal of their own choice, as described by their "Design Thesis Feasibility Report." The Design Thesis is a demonstration of all skills acquired in the implementation of change within an existing structure and context.